Wednesday, July 15, 2015

THE WOMAN IN HISTORY EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW








Post by Author Angela Raines



One of the early women in Colorado history is Maria Teresa 'Teresita' Sandoval. This amazing women was born in 1811 in Taos, in what is now the state of New Mexico. She married at seventeen and had four children, Juana, Cruzita, Jose and Rufena, with her husband Manuel Suaso. In the 1830's she moved to Mora, New Mexico Territory on a land grant given to them by the Mexican government. It was there she met Matthew Kinkead. She left her husband, took her children and moved in with Kinkead, a naturalized Mexican citizen who came from Kentucky, who also had a land grant in the area. The family left Mora and moved to the American side of the Arkansas River. In 1841 they moved to Ft. Pueblo, a trading center for trappers, travelers and Indians. There is indications she and Matthew helped build and run this Fort, planned by George Simpson, Alexander Barclay, James Beckworth and Joseph Doyle. It was a thriving business that kept the couple busy. Some of the people Teresita came into contact with is like a who's who of early American traders and trappers, James Beckworth, Jim Bridger, Kit Carson and 'Uncle Dick' Wooten, the man who built the twenty seven mile toll road over Raton Pass. http://www.legendsofamerica.com/we-richenswootton.html

Eventually Kinkead left for California with their nine year old son, Juan. At that point in 1843 Teresita moved in with Alexander Barclay and they moved to Hardscrabble, a settlement northwest of Ft. Pueblo, then later returned to Mora where Barclay planned to build a fort. He hoped to sell to the U S Government after the Mexican American war in 1848, but the government built a fort of their own. 


The only known image of Teresita, done by Alexander Barclay
coloradovirtuallibrary.org 

Teresita left Barclay sometime between 1848 and 49 and moved in with with her daughter, Cruzita, who had married Joseph Doyle, on their ranch Casa Blanca in the Arkansas River Valley. Her other daughter, Juana, married George Simpson. Teresita remained in the Arkansas River Valley the rest of her life, but she wasn't done yet. When Cruzita's husband died, Teresita took over the running of the property, keeping it from falling into the hands of rival cattleman. Teresita died 1894, a woman still in charge of her own life.

A further note on this time in history.  Before 1848 while the region Teresita lived in was still under Mexican law, women shared ownership with their husbands, could purchase land, and establish businesses on their own. Women were also allowed to divorce. Once the land became part of the United States many of these rights were taken away.

In my story 'Never Had a Chance' in the current Prairie Rose Publication anthology "Cowboy Celebration" the heroine looks up and is named for Teresita Sandoval. Leave a comment and one lucky person will win an e-book of this anthology, full of great stories and even greater recipes. Also watch for the Christmas in July event later this month from Prairie Rose Publications. You will not be disappointed with the stories awaiting you.

Product Details
"NEVER HAD A CHANCE" , second in the Agate Gulch stories, in the Prairie Rose Publications "A COWBOY CELEBRATION" anthology http://amzn.to/1GzwJhw

Product Details
HOME FOR HIS HEART the first in the Agate Gulch stories. http://amzn.to/1GJhpSu

Author Page: http://amzn.to/1I0YoeL

Angela Raines is the pen name for Doris Gardner-McCraw, Author, Speaker, Historian-specializing in
Colorado and Women's History. She also posts a photo and haiku five days a week at: http://fivesevenfivepage.blogspot.com

12 comments:

  1. Teresita really got around. Did she divorce her first husband? Did she marry the other two men, or just move in with them. I was surprised her son picked up and left her.
    Mexico was a progressive country back then. If only the United States had been that forward thinking. Amazing, isn't it, how things can change so drastically in history.
    I wish you all the best. Sorry I was late getting here.

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    1. Sarah, I would much rather you be late than never. The records, which are pretty sparce from that time frame, really don't tell whether she just moved in or actually divorced her husbands. One thing is certain, she had a mind of her own, and she is a very fascinating character. Doris

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  2. Loved this post. She did get around, didn't she? But from the sounds of things she was one strong woman and devoted to her family. I loved reading Never Had a Chance-- just finally read it this past wk. . You did a wonderful job and I'm so very pleased I was in that anthology with you. Keep those great stories coming. Bev

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    1. Bev, thank you so much for the kind words about Never Had a Chance. Tom just wanted his story to be told. He made a brief appearance in Home for His Heart, but he kept after me to tell his story. Poor Guy. As for Teresita, she had a mind of her own, that's for sure. Thanks for stopping by. Doris

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  3. Loved this post. She did get around, didn't she? But from the sounds of things she was one strong woman and devoted to her family. I loved reading Never Had a Chance-- just finally read it this past wk. . You did a wonderful job and I'm so very pleased I was in that anthology with you. Keep those great stories coming. Bev

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  4. Loved this post. She did get around, didn't she? But from the sounds of things she was one strong woman and devoted to her family. I loved reading Never Had a Chance-- just finally read it this past wk. . You did a wonderful job and I'm so very pleased I was in that anthology with you. Keep those great stories coming. Bev

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  5. She did get around! But I would still love to pour some coffee and sit with her. Can you imagine the stories she could tell?

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    1. She was a fascinating person, and lived a long life. Like you, I'd love to hear her tell her story in her own words.

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  6. Great post, so interesting :) I slipped over from the Christmas in July FB fandango :)
    I'd enjoy reading these books too ! ! dkstevensneAT outlookD OtCoM

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    1. Deanna, Thank you for stepping over and reading more about Teresita. She was quite the character. Glad you enjoyed the books. Doris/Angela

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  7. Hi Doris. This woman was a wandering woman huh? but, sounds like a strong woman. I didn't know the women anywhere could own businesses, share husbands wealth, and divorce in those years. WOW ! Always learning more about history. Would love to win this book.
    Maxie > mac262(at)me(dot)com <

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  8. Maxie, thank you for stopping by. I hope your name is drawn also. We'll see. It is a fun read.
    I also fell in love with Teresita. She is mentioned in my story Never Had a Chance. I've known of her, but the research brought out so much more. It was true, Mexico was a bit more liberal than the US in the 1800's. Doris/Angela

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